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How to communicate World Mental Health Day

Saturday 10 October is World Mental Health Day 2020. If you’ve been aware the date is coming up, but not had a chance to plan, I’ve got you covered. This article contains advice and guidance to share with employees.

Help yourself and do let me know how you are marking the day. You’re welcome to comment below or Tweet me @AllthingsIC.

I believe talking about mental health is too important to only communicate on one day, but if this initiative starts the conversations, I’m all for it.

What is it?

World Mental Health Day is a day for global mental health education, awareness and advocacy against social stigma. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health, a global mental health organisation with members and contacts in more than 150 countries.

It is recognised by the World Health Organisation on 10 October every year.

The day provides an opportunity for all stakeholders working on mental health issues to talk about their work, and what more needs to be done to make mental health care a reality for people worldwide.

See the World Federation for Mental Health website for full information and find them on Twitter @WMHDay.

This year’s theme of Mental Health for all: Greater Investment, Greater Access addresses the need to promote early access to care and the prevention of mental health difficulties and promotion of mental wellbeing. It has been set by the World Federation for Mental Health.

How to write about mental health

I recommend checking out the mentalhealth.org.uk website. It’s full of resources including the information below and their free guide to supporting mental health at work.

 

How to write about mental health according to the mentalhealth.org.uk website

Mental health is the way we think and feel and our ability to deal with ups and downs. Mental health is something we all have. When we enjoy good mental health, we have a sense of purpose and direction, the energy to do the things we want to do, and the ability to deal with the challenges that happen in our lives.

When we think about our physical health, there’s a place for keeping ourselves fit, and a place for getting appropriate help as early as possible so we can get better. Mental health is just the same.

If you enjoy good mental health, you can:

  • make the most of your potential
  • cope with what life throws at you
  • play a full part in your relationships, your workplace, and your community.

Your mental health doesn’t always stay the same. It can fluctuate as circumstances change and as you move through different stages in your life.

Distress is a word used to describe times when a person isn’t coping – for whatever reason. It could be something at home, the pressure of work, or the start of a mental health problem like depression. When we feel distressed, we need a compassionate, human response. The earlier we are able to recognise when something isn’t quite right, the earlier we can get support.

What does the law say?

We have a wide range of legal rights that protect our mental health at work. These range from basic human rights such as the right to freedom of expression and freedom of association, to the health and safety legislation that keeps us safe from hazards, including psychological hazards.

Source: mentalhealth.org.uk website

See their free guide to supporting mental health at work to find out more.

Useful resources to learn more about mental health at work

Further reading via the World Federation for Mental Health

Further reading about mental health on my blog

Mental health is a topic which is incredibly close to my heart. I’ve been investing in my own mental health through counselling for the past couple of years. My local mental health NHS Trust has been a wonderful support.

It’s ok to not be ok. It’s ok to ask for help. If I can, you can.

Thank you for stopping by, I hope you found this information helpful to help you plan.

Rachel

First published on the All Things IC blog 3 October 2020.

 

Comments

  1. Dan Holden says:

    Thanks for publishing Rachel. It’s such a key topic, both for employees and also communicators in making sure they look after themselves.

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